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USCIS regularly automatically extends TPS work permits while applications are pending. See below to see if your country’s TPS work permits were automatically extended.  If your work permit was automatically extended, it remains valid until the automatic extension expiration date.

  • El Salvador: Current work permits were automatically extended for 180 days through September 5, 2018. If an applicant requests a new work permit, it will be valid through September 9, 2019.
  • Honduras: Current work permits were automatically extended through July 4, 2018. Applying for a new work permit will produce a new work permit with an expiration date of July 5, 2018.
  • Nicaragua: TPS designation was set to expire on January 5, 2019.  To comply with the Ramos v. Nielsen court order stopping TPS terminations, TPS for Nicaragua has been automatically extended through April 2, 2019.
  • Haiti: Current work permits were automatically extended through July 21, 2018.  If an applicant requests a new work permit, it will be valid through July 22, 2019.

Frequently Asked Questions

Click on any of the items below to expand. The content on this page is updated periodically.

El Salvador: TPS designation is set to terminate on September 9, 2019.  However, the decision to terminate TPS for El Salvador is impacted by the Ramos v. Nielsen court order stopping TPS terminations, see below.

Nicaragua: TPS designation was set to expire on January 5, 2019.  To comply with the Ramos v. Nielsen court order stopping TPS terminations, TPS for Nicaragua has been automatically extended through April 2, 2019.

Haiti: TPS designation is set to terminate on July 22, 2019. However, the decision to terminate TPS for Haiti is impacted by the Ramos v. Nielsen court order stopping TPS terminations, see below.

Honduras: TPS designation will terminate on January 5, 2020.  The decision to terminate TPS for Honduras is NOT directly impacted by the Ramos v. Nielsen court order stopping TPS terminations.

El Salvador: The 60-day re-registration window ended on March 19, 2018.  If you did not re-register during the designated time-frame, we recommend that you get a consultation to see if you qualify to register late by showing you had good cause for missing the filing window.

Nicaragua: The re-registration period for Nicaragua ended on February 13, 2018.  If you did not re-register during the designated time-frame, we recommend that you get a consultation to see if you qualify to register late by showing you had good cause for missing the filing window.

Haiti: The 60-day re-registration window ended on March 19, 2018.  If you did not re-register during the designated time-frame, we recommend that you get a consultation to see if you qualify to register late by showing you had good cause for missing the filing window.

Honduras: The 60-day re-registration window ended on August 6, 2018.  If you did not re-register during the designated time-frame, we recommend that you get a consultation to see if you qualify to register late by showing you had good cause for missing the filing window.

Traveling on advance parole has many potential benefits and few potential risks.  Applicants seeking to travel on advance parole should consult with an attorney or OLAP (Office of Legal Access Programs) accredited representative before doing so.

For TPS holders affected by the Ramos v. Nielsen court order stopping TPS terminations (El Salvador, Nicaragua, Haiti, Sudan), you may continue to request advance parole for travel abroad so long as the court injunction remains.

  1. EAD (Work Permit)
  2. If you have been arrested or charged with committing any crime: Certified Final Court Dispositions or any other court documents related to any arrest or other incidents with the police; even if you previously sent those to immigration.
  3. Copy of previous application (optional, but can sometimes be useful to verify information)
  4. If you have traveled on advance parole, bring the approval notice for your advance parole and the passport that you used to travel or if you entered the U. S. with a visa, bring your passport or other documentation used to enter the United States.
  5. Money order for $85 or $495. See below.

TPS holders have the option of re-registering for TPS with or without requesting employment authorization.  The cost for registration increases significantly if an applicant also requests employment authorization.  See below.  Many applicants that do not work, or have work permits through other categories re-register for TPS without requesting a work permit.  If re-registration applicants do not request a work permit, they only pay a $85 biometrics fee.  To re-register for TPS and request a work permit costs $495 ($85 biometrics fee + $410 for the work permit).

Note: Applicants under 14 years old are not required to submit the $85 fee. 

TPS holders have the option of re-registering for TPS with or without requesting employment authorization.  The cost for registration increases significantly if an applicant also requests employment authorization.  See below.  Many applicants that do not work, or have work permits through other categories re-register for TPS without requesting a work permit.  If re-registration applicants do not request a work permit, they only pay a $85 biometrics fee.  To re-register for TPS and request a work permit costs $495 ($85 biometrics fee + $410 for the work permit).

Note: Applicants under 14 years old are not required to submit the $85 fee. 

USCIS regularly automatically extends TPS work permits while applications are pending. See below to see if your country’s TPS work permits were automatically extended.  If your work permit was automatically extended, it remains valid through the automatic extension expiration date.  Some TPS holders have work permits that were extended additional time following the Ramos v. Nielsen court order stopping certain TPS terminations.

El Salvador: Current work permits were automatically extended for 180 days through September 5, 2018.  For applicants whose work permit renewals were not processed by September 5, 2018, immigration authorized an additional 180-day extension and should have sent an official letter notifying you of the extension.  If you have not received this letter, you can call immigration at 202-272-8377 o at 800-375-5283 to request that one be mailed to you.  If an applicant requested a new work permit, it will be valid through September 9, 2019.

Honduras: Work permits were automatically extended through January 1, 2019.  https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2018/06/05/2018-12161/termination-of-the-designation-of-honduras-for-temporary-protected-status.  If an applicant requested a new work permit, it will be valid through January 5, 2020.

Nicaragua: Through the Ramos v. Nielsen court order stopping TPS terminations, work permits are now valid through April 2, 2019.  The automatic extension applies to work permits with expirations dates of January 5, 2019.  The automatic extension also applies to work permits with an expiration date of January 5, 2018 if an extension was requested during the last re-registration and has not yet been processed.

Haiti: If an applicant requested a new work permit, it will be valid through July 22, 2019

While re-registration by filing form I-821 is required to maintain TPS benefits, requesting an accompanying work permit is not necessary to maintain TPS.  See above.

While re-registration by filing form I-821 is required to maintain TPS benefits, requesting an accompanying work permit is not necessary to maintain TPS.  See above.

A fee waiver for the cost of the work permit is available to applicants who themselves or through a qualifying household member receive a means-tested public benefit, have a household income under 150% of the federal poverty guidelines, or would suffer other financial hardship.  The process of assessing fee waiver eligibility can be complicated and we recommend discussing this option with an attorney or trusted community service provider.

If you are seeking a new job or have been asked to provide current/valid authorization to work, you may present the expired work permit along with the Federal Register Notice issued by USCIS in which the employer is provided with information about the automatic extension of your work permit and instructions on how to verify your eligibility to work. The notice also informs employers of the legal consequences for acts of discrimination and their failure to accept your expired work permit as valid proof that you are authorized to work.

Below you will find links to the Federal Register notices extending your work authorization:

Nepal: April 25, 2018

Honduras: May 4, 2018

Yemen: July 5, 2018

Somalia: July 19, 2018

South Sudan: March 3, 2019

What did the court order in the case of Ramos v. Nielsen?

On October 3, 2018, the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California ordered a preliminary injunction that makes the U.S. government suspend the termination of TPS for Sudan, Nicaragua, Haiti, and El Salvador.  Injunctions are sometimes used by courts to make a party in a lawsuit either do or refrain from taking a certain action while the court case is pending.  While the order remains in effect, DHS may not terminate TPS for Sudan, Nicaragua, Haiti and El Salvador.  TPS was automatically extended for 6 months from the date of the court order (through April 2, 2019) for Nicaragua and Sudan.  Additional extensions may be required to comply with the court order so long as the injunction remains in effect.

I am a TPS holder from either Sudan, Nicaragua, Haiti, or El Salvador.  When does my TPS expire? 

To comply with the court order in Ramos v. Nielsen, DHS automatically extended TPS and the validity of TPS-related work permits for Nicaragua and Sudan through April 2, 2019.  This automatic extension applies only to those TPS holders who re-registered for TPS during the last re-registration period.  If you did not re-register during the last re-registration period, we recommend to consult with an attorney or OLAP representative to see if you may apply late with “good cause.”

How can I show my employer that my work permit remains valid after the expiration date? 

TPS holders from Nicaragua or Sudan may show their expired work permit along with the Federal Register Notice published on October 31, 2018 (https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2018/10/31/2018-23892/continuation-of-documentation-for-beneficiaries-of-temporary-protected-status-designations-for-sudan) in which the employer is provided with information about the automatic extension of your work permit through April 2, 2019 and instructions on how to verify your eligibility to work.  The notice also informs employers of the legal consequences for acts of discrimination and their failure to accept your expired work permit as valid proof that you are authorized to work.

I am a TPS holder from Sudan or Nicaragua.  Can I request a new work permit valid through April 2, 2019? 

Although you may apply for a new work permit, doing so is not required to show that you are authorized to work.  Processing times suggest that your new card may not be processed before April 2, 2019, the date of expiration.  A fee waiver for the cost of the work permit is available to applicants who themselves or through a qualifying household member receive a means-tested.

I am from El Salvador or Haiti. How does the Ramos v. Nielson case apply to me?

While a preliminary injunction remains in effect, DHS may not terminate TPS for those countries included in the injunction.   TPS holders from El Salvador or Haiti are covered in the Ramos v. Nielsoncase.  The most recent Federal Register publication automatically extended work permits for affected countries for 6 months.  El Salvador and Haiti both have TPS termination dates more than six months away, so no automatic extension is required yet.

Do I need to re-register for take any other action to make sure my TPS remains valid?

As long as you re-registered during the most recent re-registration period, for the moment, no further action is required to make sure your TPS remains valid. However, re-registration may be required in the future.  Any re-registration requirements will be announced through publication in the Federal Register.

What will happen if the court’s order in Ramos v. Nielsenis reversed on appeal?

If the court’s order is reversed on appeal, TPS for Sudan, Nicaragua, El Salvador and Haiti will remain in effect for approximately six months at a minimum. The government has agreed not to end TPS for these countries for at least 120 days after the “mandate” from the appeal is issued. The “mandate” is generally issued 52 days after a decision, but it may take longer depending on whether either party seeks further review at the Ninth Circuit or the Supreme Court.

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